Archive for currency

How to lie twice to a President and succeed (13-VI-09)

Posted in 06 - Junio, Año 2009 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 13, 2009 by Farid Matuk

Near three months ago, it was analyzed how the Ministry of Economy and the Central Bank collude in order to show awesome GDP growth rates for Peruvian economy, in order to fulfill presidential fantasies of success, and now it is possible to witness how such collusion persists in order to show Peru as the country with the highest economic growth in Latin America, and one of the highest around the world.

Less than 2 weeks ago, in May 30th, the Ministry of Economy published the MMF (Multi-annual Macroeconomic Framework) for 2010-2012, which includes an economic forecast for 2009. Yesterday, the Central Bank published its quarterly report which includes also an economic forecast for 2009. As before, there is little difference on the GDP growth rate, 3.5% for one and 3.3% for the other, but this lucky coincidence is only good for providing presidential comfort, but behind those numbers two different worlds emerge.

The table below shows how the Ministry of Economy (ME) and the Central Bank (CB) evolve in its economic forecast, and also shows the gross differences on key indicators as elasticity between imports and GDP or export growth, which has impact on the ratio trade gap – GDP, as well on foreign currency reserve, and domestic currency convertibility.

 

Institution

Date of Issue GDP growth rate Import growth rate Export growth rate
ME May 28th ‘08 6.5% 12.6% 8.0%
CB Oct 24th ‘08 6.5% 9.0% 6.2%
CB Dec 17th ‘08 6.0% 7.3% 4.6%
ME Feb 2nd ‘09 5.0% 11.0% 5.4%
CB Feb 5th ‘09 5.0% 5.5% 3.4%
ME Feb 23rd ‘09 5.0% 13.5% 5.0%
CB Mar 21st ‘09 5.0% 2.1% 1.9%
ME May 30th 09 3.5% 1.3% -2.6%
CB Jun 12th 09 3.3% -4.7% -1.3%

  

Institution Date of Issue Elasticity Import – GDP Ratio Trade Gap – GDP
ME May 28th ‘08 1.9 4.8%
CB Oct 24th ‘08 1.4 4.4%
CB Dec 17th ‘08 1.2 4.3%
ME Feb 2nd ‘09 2.2 5.0%
CB Feb 5th ‘09 1.1 4.2%
ME Feb 23rd ‘09 2.7 5.7%
CB Mar 21st ‘09 0.4 3.7%
ME May 30th 09 0.4 2.4%
CB Jun 12th 09 -1.4 0.9%

 

As before, the elasticity between imports and GDP is a clear signal of two macroeconomic forecast structures forced to converge in a GDP growth of 3.3%-3.5%. While the Ministry of Economy finds a positive elasticity, the Central Bank finds a negative elasticity which is extremely uncommon in Peruvian economic history of the last 20 years; in particular to have a negative growth rate of imports.

Last circumstance Peru had a real reduction of imports was in 1999 due to a negative GDP growth in 1998. Previous similar experience was in 1988 and 1989, when Peru has the most disastrous economic experience becoming a member of the select group of countries with hyperinflation a la Cagan (more than 10,000% annual) with a GDP contraction of more than 20%.

While Ministry of Economy forecast could be seen as straightforward optimistic and unreal, at least it is possible to foresee a conventional macroeconomic model behind with coefficients making sense with experience. On the other side, the Central Bank model looks more as a two stage model, on the first stage realistic assumptions are made (as negative imports growth due to a recession) and in the second stage comfort outcome are imposed (positive GDP growth).

 In any case, Peruvian economic authorities had shown a clear behavior of common deception to the Presidency. Both of them show a positive GDP growth which goes against common sense but on synchrony with President Garcia flamboyancy. This deceptive behavior has been analyzed previously in “How to lie to a President and succeed”.

Advertisements

How to lie to a President and succeed (16-III-09)

Posted in 03 - Marzo, Año 2009 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 16, 2009 by Farid Matuk

Peruvian economic authorities are two as in many countries, one in charge of fiscal policy and other in charge of monetary policy. As in many countries too, fiscal policy is in charge of a Minister, who is an appointee of the President; and monetary policy is in charge of the head of the Central Bank, who in Peru is choose by the Congress.

Until May 2008, both authorities had a point of agreement in economic policy and macroeconomic forecast, in a document called Multi-annual Macroeconomic Framework (Marco Macroeconómico Multianual), which is prepared by the Ministry of Economy and subscribed by the Central Bank, through an attached letter of acceptance.

Actual Peruvian president, hold the dubious record of producing the most lasting hyperinflation (Cagan definition) in Latin America, in his first tenure between 1985 and 1990, and this legacy hunts him.  At the beginning of the present economic crisis in 2008 he declared “Peru is insulated”, now he declares that Peru will be in top 5 world wide highest GDP growth for 2009, in an optimism that exudes maniac behavior.

But the world economic crisis has produced a hidden divorce in Peru economic authorities, in the process of trying to satisfy a President who believes that economic panic could be cured by hypnosis, the Ministry of Economy and the Central Bank have build macroeconomic forecast based on presidential needs and not on technical criteria.

In the table below, is possible to see how the public documents from both institutions, available through Internet, document two different ways to fulfill a GDP growth rate out of reality. ME stands for Ministry of Economy and CB stands for Central Bank.

Institution

Date of Issue

GDP growth rate

Import growth rate

Export growth rate

ME

May 28th ‘08

6.5%

12.6%

8.0%

CB

Oct 24th ‘08

6.5%

9.0%

6.2%

CB

Dec 17th ‘08

6.0%

7.3%

4.6%

ME

Feb 2nd ‘09

5.0%

11.0%

5.4%

CB

Feb 5th ‘09

5.0%

5.5%

3.4%

ME

Feb 23rd ‘09

5.0%

13.5%

5.0%

CB

Mar 21st ‘09

5.0%

2.1%

1.9%

Institution

Date of Issue

Elasticity Import – GDP

Ratio Trade Gap – GDP

ME

May 28th ‘08

1.9

4.8%

CB

Oct 24th ‘08

1.4

4.4%

CB

Dec 17th ‘08

1.2

4.3%

ME

Feb 2nd ‘09

2.2

5.0%

CB

Feb 5th ‘09

1.1

4.2%

ME

Feb 23rd ‘09

2.7

5.7%

CB

Mar 21st ‘09

0.4

3.7%

Even today is March 16th, Central Bank web site link to its March document is dated March 21st, who know why. Going to substance, the column for GDP growth rate shows a reduction from 6.5% to 5.0% from May ’08 to Mar ’09; which looks as a shy reduction to many analysts but maybe Peru has a secret formula for growth.

The column for Import growth rate shows substantial differences between the Ministry of Economy and the Central Bank, which is more evident in the column Elasticity Import – GDP. The Ministry of Economy has elasticity value that varies between 1.9 and 2.7, which fits with my own econometric estimations for this coefficient. But the Central Bank has an elasticity value that varies between 1.4 and 0.4 which is unrealistic from an econometric point of view, as well with historical data. Unless the Central Bank is planning a drastic change in its actual monetary policy, therefore the Peruvian currency will have a free fall enough large to reduce imports.

Finally, the last column shows the ratio for foreign trade and GDP, if May 2008 is taken as base line with financial markets willing to lend to emerging economies, actual circumstances imply a smaller gap since financial availability is lower than before for emerging markets. Also if terms of trade are constant, the baseline gap remains constant; but if there is deterioration of term of trade for Peru, then we have large gap; and today all analysis assumes deterioration for Peruvian terms of trade.

Assuming the Ministry of Economy export – GDP elasticity and the Central Bank export growth forecast, it is possible to simulate several scenarios. In order to reach the ratio for foreign trade and GDP of the base line, which is 4.8%, the maximum GDP growth rate feasible is 2.5%.

If foreign influx of capital is less than baseline scenario May 2008, and terms of trade deteriorated relative of baseline scenario May 2008, then GDP growth rate will be below 2.5%. From other analysis (in Spanish) made with short-term and medium-term real-sector economic cycle, the outcome is more grim with a GDP growth rate negative in 2010-Q1 of -1% (see “Fundiendo Motor” and “Compulsion a la Repeticion“).

Sun Apr 13, 2003 2:06 am

Posted in 2003-04 Abril with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2009 by Farid Matuk

Optimas RIN

En los viejos tiempos de los paquetazos, que siempre tenían esa
impecable reducción del salario mínimo legal medido en dólares como
hecho estilizado, aparte claro esta de las personalizaciones; se
argumentaba que el nivel óptimo de reservas eran las importaciones de
tres meses, el cual sería ahora un quinto del actual. Aunque el
supuesto implícito no declarado era la validez de un tipo de cambio
fijo de equilibrio para la balanza comercial.

De otro lado, en un mundo de activos y ya no de flujos, pensaría
en alguna regla de porcentaje del dinero de alto poder, a fin de
determinar el nivel óptimo de reservas a fin de garantizar
convertibilidad y desalentar los ataques especulativos, teniendo
presente que el circulante anda por unos cinco mil millones de soles
y la emisión primaria por unos seis mil millones. Como es el caso de
una economía ricardiana, donde el dinero fiduciario es únicamente el
circulante de baja denominación.

¿Cúal es la regla ahora? En caso exista alguna, por supuesto.

Farid Matuk

***************************************************
***************************************************
***************************************************
Reservas se mantienen sobre los US$ 10 mil millones

(RPP Internet) Las reservas internacionales netas ascendieron a
diez mil 615 millones de dólares, nivel superior en 172 millones
respecto al cierre de marzo, informó el Banco Central de Reservas con
datos al 8 de abril.
El aumento se debió al incremento de depósitos en el Banco Central
del sistema financiero (US$ 125 millones) y las compras netas de
moneda extranjera por el BCR (US$ 76 millones).

Estas operaciones fueron parcialmente contrarrestadas por el retiro
de depósitos del sector público (US$ 4 millones), menores depósitos
del Fondo de Seguro de Depósitos (US$ 4 millones), valuación (US$ 19
millones, de los cuales US$ 16 millones corresponden a la caída de la
cotización del oro), y otras operaciones (US$ 2 millones).

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MacroPeru/message/2772

Sat Apr 5, 2003 6:54 am

Posted in 2003-04 Abril with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2009 by Farid Matuk

 

Ley de Un Solo Precio (2)

Hola Bruno:

Primero tengo que coincidir contigo en que si las reservas se
mantuviesen constantes, el mercado se limpiaría via precios con la
consiguiente reducción de la divisa. Pero asumiendo salarios rígidos
a la baja, el resultado sería un incremento de los salarios medidos
en moneda extranjera.

De otro lado, creo que pronto empezará una campaña por un
incremento del precio de la divisa con un argumento de pérdida de
competitividad, aunque no exista consenso en como medirla, mas alla
de decir que los salarios estan altos. Como puedes ver al artículo
adjunto del 4 de marzo pasado, y ya sugerido ademas en La República
y en un mensaje previo en esta lista.

También queria plantear el problema de pronóstico de la
inflación. Recuerdo mucho como a fines del ’87 me entregaste una
hoja de cálculo con los índices detallados del IPC limeño y me fue
útil para modelar y entender la inflación de entonces. Al presente,
con las series de inflación nacional publicadas por el Instituto
sería posible hacer un ARIMA-X en panel, o un VAR mas complejo que
los usuales; pero que sepa nadie anda por ese camino y las
predicciones de inflación son mas bien una suerte de revelación
divina.

Farid Matuk

**************************
**************************
**************************
GatoEncerrado.Terra.Com.Pe

Precio del dólar S/. 3.45 soles ¿Enfermedad holandesa?

El Perú ostenta el dudoso privilegio entre los países de América
Latina de haber sufrido la menor devaluación (o mayor apreciación)
de su moneda desde la crisis asiática.

En un primer momento, puede aceptarse que puede resultar un síntoma
de estabilidad. Pero, en el mediano y largo plazo indica que las
empresas multinacionales están haciendo el negocio de su vida en el
Perú a costa de las exportaciones con valor agregado.

Eso lleva a que el tipo de cambio tienda a la baja es la masivas
exportaciones de minerales (oro, Antamina, etc.) sin que tengan un
correlato similar de crecimiento de las exportaciones con valor
agregado.

Esta es una particularidad de la economía que desalienta las
exportaciones No Tradicionales. ¿Que dirán los sabios Oscar Dancourt
y Daniel Schydlowsky hoy en el directorio del BCR?. ¿Están afónicos?

Fri Apr 4, 2003 2:15 am

Posted in 2003-04 Abril with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2009 by Farid Matuk

Ley de Un Solo Precio

En los viejos tiempos, había una discusión sobre la mejor especificación econométrica para la inflación, y este era un buen medio para validar modelos teóricos. Aparentemente, ahora estamos en un debate puramente abstracto.

En esos viejos tiempos, la mejor especificación que pude hallar estaba basada en la Ley de Un Solo Precio, donde la inflación era dependiente de la devaluación y de la inflación externa, mas no de ningún agregado monetario. Ya que los agregados monetarios, en particular, la emisión primaria era una buena variable explicativa de la devaluación. Y sólo en la forma reducida los agregados monetarios impactaban en la inflación asumiento el acervo de moneda extranjera constante.

Creo que al presente, una especificación econométrica semejante sería el mejor predictor para la inflación, pero la gran diferencia es que antes la devaluación era endógena, y al día de hoy es exógena gracias a los resultados de la balanza de pagos. Y esta exogenidad, vuelve a generar un viejo debate en torno al tipo de cambio real.

Recientemente en un periódico local se señalaba la baja tasa de devaluación local respecto al resto de países de la región, pero en 2002 tuvimos tambien la inflación mas baja de la región. En ese sentido, los reclamos por un tipo cambio real mas alto, siempre los he leido como reclamos por un salario real mas bajo, que nuevamente abre otro debate en torno al precio de equilibrio en el mercado de mano de obra.

Por esta razón, al ignorar el mercado de mano de obra en los análisis de mercado de bienes (inflación) y de activos financieros (devaluación), tiene ese sabor walrasiano de agentes económicos idénticos entre si.

Farid Matuk

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MacroPeru/message/2735